Why I (Try to) Read the Bible Everyday

I should read the Bible every day, especially that I am serving Him for years, and at the moment I am serving Him full time.

This past two weeks, I have been reading a lot of Scriptures every day. However, prior to that, a month ago and some months ago, I have been only reading it a bit, maybe once or twice a week. And it was a disaster.

As a believer I would attest with all my heart that it is really God’s Word, by that I mean the only God’s Word. We are so blessed that the Only Creator and Lover of mankind has left for us His very own words! But very few people appreciate that. In fact many people doubt that the Bible really is God’s Word.

Let me state some reasons why the Bible is God’s Word and that there is no other:

First, the Bible is Alive, it changes lives. I mean, countless lives. Reading and applying it in everyday life provides strength to the weak, wisdom to the confused, salvation to the lost, and healing to the sick. No other psychology or self-help books can do this.

Second, the Bible is Reliable, its history record is perfect. Credible historians, Christian or not have testified again and again that the Biblical Record of human history is accurate and without any error.

Third, the Bible is Prophetic, its prophecies were fulfilled and are being fulfilled. The Bible contains more than three hundred prophecies regarding the Messiah Jesus Christ alone, and all of them were fulfilled, and that is a miracle in itself. And there are many other prophecies concerning different areas, which were fulfilled. Many still are to be fulfilled concerning the end times.

Fourth, the Bible is Harmonious, its sixty-six books do not conflict. The Bible is written in a span of more than fifteen hundred years by more than forty authors, signifying that it has One Ultimate Author as the books contain a unified message of God’s Glory and Man’s Redemption without any conflict.

Fifth, the Bible is Indestructible, countless attempts to destroy it failed. Kings, Emperors, Politicians, nations, and Satan himself tried to destroy it but they all failed miserably. The Bible is still the best-selling book of all time.

Now, let me state my personal reasons why I try my best to read the Bible everyday:

First, I get to know God better thru the reading of the Bible. This is maybe my most important reason. Bible reading cause me to know my God and Savior more. It draws me closer to Him, and it brings intimacy to our relationship.

Deuteronomy 31:12 (KJV) Gather the people together, men, and women, and children, and thy stranger that is within thy gates, that they may hear, and that they may learn, and fear the LORD your God, and observe to do all the words of this law

1 John 1:3 (KJV) That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us: and truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ.

Second, it guides me. If I want to ask God about anything in life I have two basic options, prayer and Bible reading. God’s wisdom and counsel are found in the Bible.

Proverbs 4:4-6 (KJV) He taught me also, and said unto me, Let thine heart retain my words: keep my commandments, and live.

Get wisdom, get understanding: forget it not; neither decline from the words of my mouth.

Forsake her not, and she shall preserve thee: love her, and she shall keep thee.

James 1:5 (KJV) If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.

Third, it sanctifies me. The Bible shows my errors, and tells me the right ways in all things. It provides detailed instructions on the direction to go towards holiness.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 (KJV) All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:

That the man of God may be perfect

Psalms 119:9 (KJV) Wherewithal shall a young man cleanse his way? by taking heed thereto according to thy word.

Fourth, it strengthens my faith. The Bible feeds my soul in my daily walk in life as a Christian. I do not rely on emotions and feelings, but in the Biblical Faith in my walk in life.

Romans 10:8 (KJV) But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;

Romans 10:17 (KJV) So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.

Matthew 4:4 (KJV) But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.

Fifth, the Bible is the best Christian Worker Handbook. Thru the Bible I get to know how to serve God in the most God-glorifying way.

2 Timothy 3:16-17 (KJV) All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:

That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.

2 Timothy 2:15 (KJV) Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.

I will age and God willing attain an old age but my need for the Bible well never cease for the Word stands forever.

Psalms 119:89 (KJV) For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven.

Why we need the New Testament

Why the New Testament is relevant and needed today is a very good thought to ponder. The New Testament in invaluable to the Bible as a whole, and to the Christians. Without the New Testament, God’s Revelation to man will not be complete, and without it, the saints will not fully understand nor realised God’s purposes.

Why the New Testament is needed:

The New Testament is God’s Revelation about the New Convenant which is superior to the Old Covenant. The Old Covenant highlights the Law which God gave to Moses as a means of appeasing God’s anger and coming back to God. However, history reveals that it is never sufficient, for man could not and could never fulfill his obligations. The New Convenant is the superior one, highlighting the sacrifice of Jesus as God’s Lamb as a way of bringing man to God.

The New Testament brings God’s Redemptive Plan to man in completion. Having the Old Testament alone is not complete. Genesis 3:15, the seed of God’s Redemptive Plan will never be realised or understood without the New Testament. New Testament brings this to light and confusion is removed.

The New Testament fulfilled the expected Messiah from the Old Testament. The prophets prophesied more than 300 prophecies about the Messiah. All of Israel was waiting for His Coming. In the Gospels from the New Testament, the waiting has come to an end and almost all the prophecies were fulfilled, and the remaining few will be realised on His Second Coming.

The New Testament gives the final information on how God will put the end to evil, and bring Glory to His Kingdom and to His saints. On earth, Christians are sojourners, as citizens of heaven. The New Testament, especially the Gospels and some Pauline Epistles and Revelation give the details on how God will put an end to all the sufferings of His Children, how He will put an end to Satan once and for all, and gives us the glimpses of the future Glory to come reserved to God alone and His children. And this is our present hope, as we ensure in this broken world.

The Church is so blessed today to hold in her hands the complete 66 books of the Bible. The Early Church has only access to the Old Testament and some of the Pauline and General Epistles. God’s Word is under attack and under fire today as many scholars and critics try to challenge the authenticity and authority of those 66 books. Some on the other hand try to include other books to the Bible.

Let us then all pray and use our Bibles for personal growth and for the furtherance of God’s Kingdom. In Faith we believe that the 66 books of the Bible were given to us to glorify God.


Hebrews 4:12 (KJV) For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart.

Psalms 12:6 (KJV) The words of the LORD are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times.

Isaiah 40:8 (KJV) The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever.

Preaching as Public Speaking

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True, preaching is a divine task, yet basically it is also a form of public speaking. A true preacher will eventually realise that as much as preaching involves spiritual dynamics, it also certainly includes oratory skills. These oratory skills constitute the technical aspect of preaching.

Before I tell about this technical aspect of preaching, or the oratory skills, which make us realise that preaching is a form of public speaking, let me tell first some important points to consider.

The first point is that though the technical side of preaching is important, still the spiritual side is more important. Preaching is firstly divine, then secondly it is public speaking. Preaching achieves eternal spiritual fruits, something that ordinary public speaking can never produce.

The second point to consider is that no methodology is holy, no matter how helpful it is in preaching. The techniques of delivering a sermon are never holy in themselves, though they are blessed by God as secondary tools to deliver His Word. Only the written words of God in the Bible are holy; the Word of God is holy, not our methods and techniques. The Word that we try to deliver everytime we preach is the one that revives the spirit and strengthens the soul, it is certainly not the preaching in itself.

Psalms 12:6 (KJV)  The words of the LORD are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times.
Romans 1:16 (KJV)  For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.
1 Thessalonians 1:5 (KJV)  For our gospel came not unto you in word only, but also in power, and in the Holy Ghost, and in much assurance; as ye know what manner of men we were among you for your sake.

Now that we have already discussed that the spiritual side of preaching outweighs the technical, we can now discuss the latter, and that describes preaching as a form of public speaking.

Preaching involves skills and techniques that enhance the delivery of our sermons (not the power but only the delivery). These skills basically revolve around the use of voice, eye contact, facial expressions, and gestures and movements.

The proper utilization and creative use of voice is of utmost importance in preaching, for the fact that spoken words serve as the medium for the transmission of God’s message to the hearers. A dull and monotonous voice will certainly invite boredom in the hearers. There are four P’s that could be used for the efficient use of voice during the discourse of God’s Word.

The first P is Pitch, or the raising and lowering of voice tone. The first and probably the easiest step that we could do to avoid a monotonous and boring sermon delivery is by putting stress on some words or phrases by varying the voice tone. We could also achieve this by varying the voice volume. Generally, heightening the pitch and increasing the volume on some words and phrases would put emphasis on the ideas that those words or phrases present.

The second P is Punch, and it is very similar to Pitch in its purpose of putting a stress on an important idea. However, what differentiates punch from an ordinary stress is that punch is usually used for some climactic expressions and thoughts, and is usually achieved by either a sudden or a much more powerful change of voice tone or volume.

The third P is Pause, and it is of equal importance to punch. We utilise pause also in trying to put emphasis on some ideas. We give around a three-second pause after saying something to indicate that what we have just told is important. Furthermore, by utilising the pause technique we give the hearers an ample amount of time to digest and reflect on the important idea given.

The fourth and final P in utilizing the voice is Progress. It is maybe the hardest one to master, but if done correctly will prove not only to emphasize a good point but furthermore to elevate the hearers’ interest and to provoke a more positive response. Generally, progress is effectively achieved by the continuous increase of the voice tone and volume beginning at the start of an idea you would like to emphasize, and then concluded with a strong punch at the end. Thus, progress is indeed the combination of the techniques of pitch and punch in a prolonged manner. Finally, progress becomes even more effective if followed by a pause. Those are the four P’s for the efficient utilization of voice, the pitch, punch, pause, and progress.

Another important factor to consider in the good delivery of the sermon is the eye contact technique. The function of eye contact in preaching is twofold: the transmission of truth and feedback.

Without eye contact, no matter how well we could use our voice we will never be able to truly connect to our listeners. It is a very awkward moment for the hearers to listen to a preacher who does not look at them, most specifically at their eyes. At worst, the hearers could feel offended. With the good use of eye contact, even the preacher who has not yet mastered the use of voice will be able to connect with his listeners.

Using eye contact to connect with listeners involves looking straight at the eyes, for around 3-5 seconds. If intimidated by the listeners, you could look also at the forehead. Look at them individually, trying to connect with each one of the listeners, for the duration of the preaching, if their number is around fifty. If their number is around a hundred or more, then having a look for each one becomes virtually impossible. In this case, using creative imagination, group the entire audience into several smaller groups mostly consisting of around five people each. Then try to look at the middle person of each group, and it will give them the impression that you are genuinely interested in them.

Furthermore, eye contact is arguably the single most effective tool to gain feedback from the hearers. If you want immediate feedback during the course of your preaching, the best way is by looking at them. That way you will immediately see if they are really listening or interested, and you as the speaker will be able to adjust your delivery to suit the emerging need. Eye contact demands that we have mastery of our sermon content. It is hard to practice good eye contact with the hearers if we are  relying too much on our notes or if we are not confident enough in our own message and delivery.

Then comes the technique of facial expressions. A serious message of rebuke and correction demands a serious emotion, but could also be told with a subtle smile and a sincere look – it depends on the ability of the preacher. Generally, laughter is very much minimal in preaching, overall the general emotions permeating are those of seriousness, sincerity, love, holiness, and command – those traits characterise very much a true preacher. A careful examination on the preaching of Jesus, the Apostles, and even of the prophets reveal the same thing. This is only my personal conviction, but I am not a follower of those preachings that use jokes and laughter just to engage the listeners. In my varied experiences in preaching, I have seen how a serious delivery of a sermon could captivate the listeners from start to finish, of course, with the power of the Word and the Holy Spirit.

Other equally important factors are gestures and body movements. With gestures, we pertain to the movements of the upper body, mostly those of the shoulders, arms, and hands. With body movements, we talk about the movements of the legs and feet.

The content dictate the gestures, and not the other way around. This means that the shoulders, arms, and hands movements reflect the true emotions and thoughts of the preacher. When I was just beginning to preach, I used to practice my gestures, and my actions looked like ‘scripted movements’, there was no life in them. Later on, as I gradually developed as a preacher, it is the message that would consume my heart and mind. That way, gestures flowed out naturally, and they certainly looked natural. Powerful gestures reveal connected movements, that is, the movements of the hands are not separated from those of the arms, the shoulders, and the upper body.

Body movements involving the legs and feet contribute to the lively delivery of the sermon. Personally, I like to get in touch with the hearers in the most possible way and to communicate with them in the most personal way, and I do that mostly by leaving the pulpit and walking towards them. Occasional walking is helpful, too much is already distracting. Another helpful thing about walking is that it relieves the tension and let go of nervousness.

The general rule regarding gestures and body movements is that the larger the audience, the bigger the gestures and body movements. The larger the audience, the further the pulpit is from the audience, so the preacher will likely to be seen by all.

A climactic note that I would like to add for all of these skills is that the Spirit of God and His anointing enhance all of them. In fact, I could attest that whenever I am filled with the Word and the Holy Spirit all of these skills just flowed out naturally and powerfully. Furthermore, the Holy Word and the Spirit of God have taught me to do these skills naturally, far better than what my training and practice did for me.

So I have presented the technical side of preaching, the side that tells us that preaching is also public speaking. We do not try to learn and master this aspect for the purpose of increasing the power of our preaching – only God could do that with our humble cooperation of holiness, submission, prayer, and obedience. As Robert McCheyne once told us, ‘A holy minister is an awesome weapon in the hand of God.’

What these techniques do for us preachers are to enhance the delivery of our sermon, to make it lively, penetrating, and connecting, and to catch the interest and attention of our listeners. True, the technical side is important, but we must not substitute it to the power of the Word and the Holy Spirit to change the lives of the listeners. The true mark of a preacher is not his very good oratory skills (though it may include these), but the divine capacity to change the lives of the hearers.

*I am indebted to Mr. Haddon Robinson for some of my learnings in oratory skills in preaching. I recommend his book Biblical Preaching, second edition.