Does Satan Work for God?

Does the Devil work for God? Short Answer: No. Long Answer that will require explanation: Yes.

The Devil does not work for God in the sense that the Devil hates to do so; he sees God as an enemy so his plans and actions are motivated to destroy or thwart or at least delay God’s plans and purposes.

However, because God is in control and accomplishes His purposes and that includes overruling the Devil’s actions, indirectly the Devil serves or works for God. To be a little more technically accurate, the Devil is a tool that is being used by God to accomplish His purposes.

Let us take the greatest ‘murder’ in all of human history as an example. (I put quotation marks for murder because it was not a murder after all, for Jesus voluntarily gave His life – John 10:11–15). And that is the Death of Jesus.

Who killed Jesus? The Jews? Pontius Pilate? Satan? The Pharisees? Well, they all had their part in killing Jesus, so partially they all did kill Jesus, they contributed to His physical earthly death.

However, it was God Himself who killed Jesus. It all started when God spoke of it in the Garden of Eden:

Genesis 3:15 (KJV) And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.

That Scripture tells us that it was God who dictated what will surely happen in the future at the Cross: The Messiah would physically die as an Offering to God for man’s salvation, and thru that death Satan would be permanently defeated. That’s it. God ordained the death of His Son and the Son agrees to the plan of the Father:

John 10:11, 15, 17-18 (KJV) I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.

As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father: and I lay down my life for the sheep.

Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again.

No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.

Those Scriptures tell us plainly that it was not Satan who took away Jesus’s life – but it was the plan of the Father and the Son for the Messiah to be killed. It might seem brutal to us, but it was the Father who killed the Son. Again, another Scripture:

Acts 2:23-24 (KJV) Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain:

Whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that he should be holden of it.

So, in that incident, it was God’s plan to offer the Messiah as the perfect Lamb who takes away the sin of the world (John 1:29), and the Jewish leaders and the unbelieving Jews and Satan took their respective parts in fulfilling it. So indirectly, the Devil did work for God.

Another example is the popular suffering of Job. Satan wanted to destroy the faith and devotion of Job to God, yet God wanted to strengthen Job’s faith and to show to Satan that Job loves God above all else, not because He is blessing Job. So again Satan was just a tool.

The more the Devil rebel against God, the more of God’s Justice and Holy Wrath will be magnified; the more people sin, the more God’s Grace of Forgiveness and God’s Righteous Judgement will be glorified.

Everything has been directed by God, and in the End everything and everyone will have their respective places as determined by God as revealed in the Bible.

Criticism or Love?

English: Christians in Action, Parkview Road. ...
Often, in the Church we find judgement and judgemental people.

Humanly, it is very easy to judge, especially in a Christian community. I have observed again and again that Christians are more prone to judge than the others.

And why?

Christians know better. We have a lot more of the moral values at our disposal. We know a lot regarding the right and wrong, the high standards of acceptable ethical living. But these things, no matter how good they are, are being used by the devil to bring discord to relationships and the brethren. Our knowledge of morality is being used by Satan to our destruction.

We easily become backbiters, when we discover that some of the brethren has certain weaknesses that we do not have. Or, when we are criticized, admonished, or corrected, we become super self-protective that we deny them and criticize them in return – all because we are self-righteous. These devilish attitudes are very common and observable in the Christian community. We see seldom see mature Christians who are able to face correction and criticism in humble ways.

On the part of those who give criticisms, very few of them are correcting their brethren for the sake of love. Very, very, rare. More often they simply do it out of self-righteousness too, to exalt the selves by degrading others. Their ways of correction easily reveal the inner motives of their heart.

One good example of what I am saying can be observed during the meeting of leaders. When one leader is accused by another leader, the accused one retaliates by pointing out the weaknesses of the one who corrects him or her. There is no real acceptance or acknowledgement of the mistake, only refusal and self-protection. This example is very common. There are many others which strongly illustrate my idea.

What is happening to the Christian churches? Where is the love? It is very good to return to the exhortation of Paul to the Galatians:

 (Gal 6:1-5) Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted. Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ. For if a man think himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceiveth himself. But let every man prove his own work, and then shall he have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another. For every man shall bear his own burden.

We should bear one another, and not fight or pull down the other. We should not think lofty of ourselves, for we are accountable ourselves to the Lord. Looking too much onto others diminishes our real examination of the self.