Tag Archives: preaching

Let the Fire Glow

I have been preaching for several months already in my new local church, the Jesus Lamb of God Church. But, I feel that I lack the fire that has been present in my years of preaching.

I know that partly it is because of my lack of prayer. Also, that I lack the usual over two weeks of preparation that I had before every time I preach.

The biggest reason, I believe, is because even though I occasionally pray and study the Bible, my heart is very far from God. Many times I am guilty of disobeying God. Many times for consecutive weeks I am not able to fulfill my promise of fasting.

I know it will take much discipline and hard work, and of course God’s grace, but I will once again be close and intimate with my God and be a powerful pager again.

“A holy minister is an awesome weapon in the hand of God.” – Robert McCheyne.

This Physical Body

This physical body often puts me down
Tired and exhausted for virtually everyday
How could I do things
That I naturally would want to
If this body pulls and puts me down

Read that, these, and read those
Eyes going teary
Mind shutting down
But I should go on
Yes go on as long as there’s
Something left to hold on

Continue little soldier,
There are still many enemies
Press on student,
Requirement still go your way
Go on preacher
Souls are hungering for truth
Don’t give up Christian,
Your race is not yet done

Where is Grace
I need it more now
Please strengthen me
I do not want to die
Lead me on
Empower me
Fill me up
To the brim
I pray, yes, I beg

Everything is not about us

English: Pulpit at St Nicholas of Mira Church ...
Preaching is a sacred task that requires a sacred heart.

I stepped in and walked forward
Amidst the crowd and in front of the lights
All eyes were toward me
Seeing and beholding all my glory
And I gave my best, oh yeah
Knowing that they liked me

Cheers and whispers and smiles
They were all because of my glaring presence
I took a proud bow in my heart
Yes, this is me
I told in my heart
The most wonderful person of all
Adored and worshiped among all

Standing before the pulpit
Without any sign of nervousness
My manuscript was within my hand
Ready to deliver my grand stand
I believed I could do that well
No need to pray and depend on Someone else

I spoke with a confident voice
They all stood in awe
I knew I had it
I made myself even wiser
Flowering my words with eloquence

I walked away from the pulpit
Trying to sound wiser still
I spoke words without looking
At the papers
Impressing the crowd with
Thoughts that were locked in

In the middle of nowhere
A sudden thing occurred
I lost my words
And my mind stopped
To offer me thoughts

This could not be right
I would lost my dignity and prestige
Before all in shame

Alas! My tongue went twisted too
I could not utter a word properly
But I could recompose myself
And recuperate from this
I dictated my heart

Ahhh… Err…
My tongue would not obey me
My mind became stubborn
I felt my cheeks as hot as iron
And the people began to laugh

I took hurried downward steps
In humiliation I almost slipped
The manuscript that I was holding
Flew into the air
I never turned back to get it
All I wanted was to rush to the door

At home I cried and prayed
And in great rebuke
My Father Lord told
Everything is not about me
But everything should be done
Only for His Glory

 

The Delight of Teaching God’s Word

English: ESV Study Bible Hardcover Cover
ESV Study Bible – the Study Bible I often use when studying the Bible.

Teaching the Word of God is truly a delight. It is one of the few things in life that truly brings pleasure to my soul.

Teaching requires that we study the teaching material first. In the endeavor to teach the Bible, in any form, in preaching, Bible Study, evangelism, or others, studying it first gluttons my heart to high spiritualities. It is one of the wonders any Bible teacher experiences from time to time. It is in fact listening to God.

A true teacher of the Scriptures will do his or her best to live out what he or she is preparing to teach. This, again, fulfills the deepest longings of the soul. Any true obedient disciple of Christ knows that trying to live in the perfect will of God is one sure thing to live a meaningful, fulfilled life. It is the highest achievement any human can achieve.

Then comes the blessed task of teaching it. If we have tried our best to study and live the Message, then the act of teaching is really in a sense a completed task. It has its own duties, but once we have tried to study and live the Word, then we can be assured that God will bless also our work of teaching to others what we have experienced ourselves.

What Makes a Preacher Good

by: Ben Mandrell, Pursuing a doctorate at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee.

http://www.crosswalk.com/church/pastors-or-leadership/what-makes-a-preacher-good-11635719.html

You probably have noticed that preachers come in all shapes and sizes. There are big, gregarious, sweaty-foreheaded preachers. There are short, slim, soft-spoken preachers. There are creative preachers who always have a slick gadget or a clever object of illustration. There are King James preachers who love the Thees and the Thous of Thy Holy Word.

So, what makes for a faithful preacher? Because God has not called preachers to be successful but faithful, how can we be sure we are staying true to the call? Here are a few biblical criteria to keep us on track:

The preacher should give people a bigger picture of God.
“For we do not preach ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord” (2 Cor. 4:5).

Ultimately, people need to be told repeatedly  that the God of Scripture is bigger than all of man’s problems. While preachers are wise to speak regarding complex issues of the culture, the need for people on Sunday morning is actually quite simple: Their minds need to be reprogrammed to the idea that God is in control, that He loves them tremendously and that nothing is impossible for Him. How quickly we forget these truths! With the constant barrage of media messages, the average person struggles to maintain a biblical perspective about life. Our world drifts off kilter fast, but the preacher can have a powerful role in bringing the listener back to the center as he or she proclaims the unchanging gospel.

The preacher should train people to turn to the Bible when problems arise.
“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Tim. 3:16-17).

The type of question I must answer as a pastor every Monday morning is: Are people being pointed back to the Word when work dries up, a child is diagnosed with a terminal disease or when in-laws sabotage a vacation? The Bible is able to meet all of their needs; a pastor is not. As the preacher brings forth the Word week after week, people should be increasingly convinced “all Scripture is God-breathed” and that His Word is able to equip them for every good work.

The preacher should show people how to read, study and handle the Bible for themselves.
“Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth” (2 Tim. 2:15).

The Bible is a very difficult book to read. Let’s face it—we find it easier to read a New York Times bestseller than Leviticus or Amos. A keen understanding of Scripture requires a certain level of skill and a special illumination of the Spirit. In corporate worship, the preacher should challenge people to cry out to God for the wisdom that flows from Isaiah, Deuteronomy and Revelation. In addition, the preacher should demonstrate how God has penetrated his own heart with the truths he presents. His interpretation not only has been defended in the sermon, but it has been digested. The congregation sees this Word after it has been made flesh, and this heightens their interest, as well as his credibility. He handles the Word with precision.

The preacher should teach all parts of the Bible and show how unique and wonderful each section truly is.
“For I have not hesitated to proclaim to you the whole will of God” (Acts 20:20, 27).

Personally, I could camp out in James for a decade. I love that book. It is short, fast-paced and practical for everyday life. However, Malachi was inspired by God, too, and was placed in the Bible because it contains essential truth for spiritual growth. The preacher should deliver a well-rounded meal throughout the calendar and proclaim all parts of the Bible, not just his “bread and butter.” The best preachers make themselves servants of the Word and handle it all with reverence.

The preacher should challenge people to own the truth by responding to the message.
“Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says” (James 1:22-27).

What good is knowledge if it does not lead to life change? Every person who went to school can recall a particular lecture on math or science that left students wondering, “What good will that ever do me?” Unlike that moment, congregants should leave on Sunday knowing the message demanded a real and practical response from them. That reaction will vary from person to person. It might include an inward decision to trust God with this week’s electric bill; it may be an act of humility demonstrated through a heartfelt apology; or it may be an act of generosity as one writes a check to the homeless ministry. There must be some reaction when the Word is preached. Faithful preachers do not hesitate to bring the challenge.

The preacher should prove that the Bible is ancient yet it speaks to us today.
“Take to heart all the words I have solemnly declared to you this day…They are not just idle words for you—they are your life” (Deut. 32:46-47).

Flip through the Bible for five minutes, and you will find this book contains all kinds of bizarre history, visions and facts. There are golden cows, weird temple furnishings and visions of wheels in the sky. The preacher must do more than just prove to have studied all week long. He must show how through his or her study of history the present and future can be impacted by how others benefit from this study. Harry Emerson Fosdick declared, “Only the preacher proceeds still upon the idea that folk come to church desperately anxious to discover what happened to the Jebusites.” That is so true! Pastors must work hard at the task of application and contextualization. What does this passage have to do with his or her life on Monday? Effective preachers answer that question carefully and thoughtfully.

The bottom line is this: Just because a person appears on television or has his or her face pasted on a billboard does not mean he or she is an effective, faithful preacher of the Word. Pastor, be true to your call; and be sure you are fulfilling your God-given role as a proclaimer of that Word.

“If you can stay out of the ministry, stay out of the ministry.”

I was delivering a sermon on our Preaching Class.

‘If you can do anything else, do it. If you can stay out of the ministry, stay out of the ministry.’

Those were the words of strong conviction by the great preacher Charles Spurgeon, affirmed by another great preacher, D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones in his book Preaching and Preachers, page 105.

By the word ministry, these men pertain to Pastoral Ministry, with emphasis on the divine task of preaching. To explain their conviction, they only mean that if a man is called to preach (and to pastor), it should only be what he is doing, it is only his satisfaction and way of life. No secular work, no business. Just to pastor and preach.

Hard statement, and personally it hit my heart. I truly love the task of preaching: from preparing sermons, trying to live out the message and the act of delivering it to the church. Seeing that other pastors and fellow believers affirm me personally that I have the gift of preaching puts more confidence in my heart that I am called to preach.

However, that confidence is challenged as I read the above statement of Mr. Spurgeon. Right now I am facing an important decision that I have to make very soon: taking up secular college studies. Do I have to study again, this time in secular, with the purpose of teaching in secular schools someday? Then what about Spurgeon’s belief that Preaching is a calling so big that it demands your entire life? And if God is leading me to study in secular, then does that mean I am never called to preach?

Not just mind-hammering, but heart-tearing questions. Preaching is the passion of my life. And if Spurgeon’s conviction is biblical and true, then entering the secular career of teaching is in a sense ‘giving-up’ the call to preach and to pastor. Well of course I do not see Spurgeon as infallible, nor his words equal to the authority of the Bible. But he was a great man of God who dedicated all his life to the divine task of preaching. Very few can surpass the blessedness of his preaching ministry.

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And if Spurgeon were right, then how about the sincere pastors out there who have secular work? Are they sinning and belittling the call to preach?

Preachers are Broken People (most of the time)

not strong but weak
A preacher is often weak on the inside.

Generally, preachers are not strong people, but weak individuals strongly used by God for His Kingdom purposes.

Dynamic preachers are usually seen as strong people, not knowing the aches and struggles they face behind the pulpit. Preaching for more than five years already, I could say from experience and observation of others some facets of the weaknesses preachers face from time to time.

1.) Lacking the zeal to study harder. Preachers should study not just to prepare sermons, but also to nourish the self. Hard study and meditation and memorization should ever equip the heart and mind of the preacher – and that is an absolute rule. Every man of God, and certainly the preacher, should have his blood with the Word on it.

2.) Lacking the desire and effort to live what he preaches. One frustration of the preacher is failing to measure up his own life for what he preaches. Yet, even worse, the lack of the desire to live his message. Sometimes, the heart could be so cold and dark that there is no real desire to walk his talk.

One of the biggest fulfilment of a preacher is seeing his life living out his sermon. It has always been an ideal for me to follow the great example of the great teacher and reformer Ezra: study the Word, then live it up, then teach it to others. And that is Ezra 7:10.

3.) Lacking the humility to pray more than enough. The persistence and intensity of the preacher to pray for the power of his sermons has no limitation. But often, he is easily caught by the temptation to pray just enough or less than enough – with no tears at all. Not willing enough to pray for more reflects a heart hardened by pride. It is an indication that he relies on himself a little bit (or too much) and not totally on God.

Often, I have found my preaching to be very dynamic and fruitful, not so much because of my own prayers – thanks to the prayers of others. Again, this is one great gem in the secret of Spurgeon’s power in preaching – his congregation continuously prays for his preaching.

Preachers are broken people. But maybe it is more truthful to say that the most powerful preachers are those who are truly broken – not necessarily broken by sin, but is broken before the Lord in utmost humility, dependence, and submission. It is truly a paradox in God’s design that He uses weak vessels to contain the insurmountable divinity of the Word, spilling out His grace, mercy, and love to the lost world. And it is still a greater paradox that even if God uses the weak to display His strength, there is still the great standard for every preacher to imitate dearly the holiness of Jesus, the Master Teacher.